Refracting Telescope

How Do Telescopes Work - Telescope Making Made Easy

The first thing to keep in mind when you’re making a telescope by hand, on your own, is to know exactly how it functions. The basic objective of a telescope is to magnify an object that is at a distance and make it appear much closer than it actually is, by bringing its image at the focal distance of the viewing lens. You can learn all you need to know about the method of do-it-yourself telescope constructions through various mediums.

 

It is possible to learn about telescope construction through various sites on the internet. Telescope making is also considered an art by various people. It is not just readymade telescopes which are well made. Amateur constructions are often good enough to give professional instruments a run for their money. Many authors have written about telescope construction at home, and such works are available for your perusal at local libraries also.

 

Simple instructions that can help you construct your own telescope are described below. The essential components required for the construction are:

 

1. Two magnifying glasses (reading lenses are sufficient, with one lens being slightly larger than the other one)

2. A cardboard cylinder (e.g. from a roll of gift-wrapping paper)

3. Duct tape

4. Permanent marker

5. Scissors

6. A measuring scale

7. Printed paper

 

Place the larger lens on the printed paper. Place the second lens between eye level and the bigger lens such that the print on the paper is clearly visible. This happens only when the print is at the focal point of the lens. In such a position, distance between the two lenses should be measured.

 

One inch from one end of the cylinder, mark the spot and cut a slot into the tube. This slot is meant to hold the larger lens. The previously measured distance being taken as a reference, a second slot must be cut into the tube to hold the second lens.

 

Place the two lenses in the slots such that the bigger lens is at the front end and the smaller one is towards the back. Tape the lenses into position using the duct tape. The portion of the tube behind the smaller lens can be cut off so that it is easier to view through the lens. View the print on the paper through the eyepiece, i.e. the smaller lens now. Adjust the distance between the glasses if the print is not in exact focus.

 

This is the simplest method of constructing a refracting telescope on your own at home. Several online pages will be able to provide you with assistance on this process. If you research carefully before starting out on the task, the whole process will not be a very difficult task to accomplish. The most important thing is to know the principle behind each component of the telescope, specifically the magnifying lenses. If you’re making a different kind of telescope, you will be using mirrors instead of lenses. If this information is known, constructing your own telescope will be a cinch.

About the Author

Discover more about coronado solar telescopes as well as critical new developments in telescopes when you visit http://www.howdotelescopeswork.com, the online portal for telescopes making and how to use telescopes

How does a refracting, reflecing and radio telescope work?

Please explain in detail for each one. Thanks.

A refractor bends light by using lenses that the light passes through. A reflector bends light by reflecting it off of curved mirrors. A radio telescope is just a radio receiver with a directional antenna. Many of them are the big dish antennas which work exactly like a reflecting optical telescope, but with radio waves. All telescopes bring the light (or radio waves) to a focus, or a single point, where a detector can examine it. The detector may be a camera or your eye, which can examine millions of points at the same time to make an image. In the case of a radio telescope it can only examine the brightness, or radio intensity, of one point at a time, so they have to scan the antenna around an area, measuring the brightness of each "pixel" separately, and use a computer to make an image out of all the measurements.




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