Space Shuttle Patches

The "Eureka" legend of Archimedes (287-212 BC) can be considered an early account of the use of forensic science. In this case, by examining the principles of water displacement, Archimedes was able to prove that a certain crown was not made of gold, as it was being fraudulently claimed, by its density and buoyancy. The earliest account of using fingerprints to establish identity was during the 7th century AD. According to Soleiman, an Arabic merchant, a debtor's fingerprints were affixed to a bill, which would then be given to the lender. This bill was henceforth, legally recognized as a proof of the validity of the debt.

The first written account of using medicine and entomology to solve criminal cases is attributed to the book Xi Yuan Ji Lu, translated as "Collected Cases of Injustice Rectified", written in 1248 China by Song Ci (1186-1249). In one of the accounts, the case of a person murdered with a sickle was solved by a death investigator who instructed everyone to bring their sickles to one location. Flies, attracted by the smell of blood, eventually gathered only on a certain sickle. In the light of this, the murderer eventually confessed. The book also offered advice on how to distinguish between a drowning (water in the lungs) and strangulation (broken neck cartilage).

In sixteenth century Europe, medical practitioners in the army and university settings began to gather information on the cause and manner of death. Ambrose Paré, a French army surgeon, systematically studied the effects of violent death on internal organs. Two Italian surgeons, Fortunato Fidelis and Paolo Zacchia, laid the foundation of modern pathology by studying the changes that occurred in the structure of the body as a result of diseases. In the late 1700s, various writings on these topics began to appear. These included - "A Treatise on Forensic Medicine and Public Health" by the French physician Fodéré, and "The Complete System of Police Medicine" by the German medical expert Johann Peter Franck.

In 1775, a Swedish chemist by the name of Carl Wilhelm Scheele devised a way of detecting arsenous oxide, simple arsenic, in corpses, but only in large quantities. This investigation was expanded, in 1806, by a German chemist Valentin Ross, who learnt to detect the poison in the walls of a victim's stomach, and by English chemist James Marsh, who used chemical processes to confirm arsenic as the cause of death in an 1836 murder trial.

Two early examples of English forensic science in individual legal proceedings demonstrated the increased use of logic and procedure in criminal investigations. In 1784, in Lancaster, England, a person called John Toms, was tried and convicted for murdering Edward Culshaw with a pistol. When the dead body of Culshaw was examined, a pistol wad, basically crushed paper used to secure powder and balls in the muzzle, which was found in his head wound, matched perfectly with a torn newspaper found in Toms' pocket. In 1816, in Warwick, England, a farm laborer was tried and convicted for the murder of a young maidservant. She had been found drowned in a shallow pool and bore the marks of violent assault on her body. The police, upon investigating, found footprints and an impression from corduroy cloth with a sewn patch in the damp earth near the pool. They also found scattered grains of wheat and chaff from the scene of crime. The breeches of a farm laborer, who had been threshing wheat nearby, were examined and later corresponded exactly to the impression in the earth near the pool.

Forensic Science [http://www.e-ForensicScience.com] provides detailed information on Forensic Science, Forensic Science Degrees, Forensic Science Colleges, Forensic Science Schools and more. Forensic Science is affiliated with Biotechnology Careers.

A small hole in the wing of a space shuttle requires a 17.7 cm2 patch.(a) What is the patch's area in km^2?

b) If the patching material costs NASA $2.77/in2, what is the cost of the patch?

a) 1 cm = 1e-2 m = 1e-2 * 1e-3 km = 1e-5 km

Therefore, 1 cm^2 = 1e-10 km^2

17.7 cm^2 = 1.77 e-9 km^2

b) 1 in = 2.54 cm, so 1 in^2 = 2.54^2 cm^2 = 6.45 cm^2
So 17.7 cm^2 = (17.7/6.45) in^2 = 2.74 in^2
2.74 * 2.77 = $7.60




NEW OLD STOCK NASA SPACE SHUTTLE ERA STS 126 MISSION IRON ON PATCH
NEW OLD STOCK NASA SPACE SHUTTLE ERA STS 126 MISSION IRON ON PATCH

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Vintage Space Shuttle NASA Endeavor Patch Baseball Cap Trucker Hat Snapback
Vintage Space Shuttle NASA Endeavor Patch Baseball Cap Trucker Hat Snapback

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NASA Discovery Shuttle Patches STS 60  STS 111
NASA Discovery Shuttle Patches STS 60 STS 111

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NASA Spacelab 3 Patches EGG
NASA Spacelab 3 Patches EGG

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STS 107 NASA Space Shuttle Columbia Embroidered Patch Iron On 3 3 4 x 5
STS 107 NASA Space Shuttle Columbia Embroidered Patch Iron On 3 3 4 x 5

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NASA Space Shuttle Final Flight Flown Patch Presentation STS 133 STS 134 STS 135
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NOS NASA SPACE SHUTTLE ERA SPACELAB 2 ASTRONOMY PHYSICS BIOLOGY SEW ON PATCH
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NASA PATCH 3 inch STS 1 Space Shuttle COLUMBIA Young Crippen
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Vintage NASA PATCH STS 115 Space Shuttle ATLANTIS Intl Space Station ISS 12A
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3 NASA Patch STS 100 Space Shuttle Endeavour Mission Rominger Ashby
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NASA SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA STS 107 5 PATCH PATCHES
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NASA SPACE SHUTTLE ERA INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION IRON ON PATCH
NASA SPACE SHUTTLE ERA INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION IRON ON PATCH

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