Wide Angle Binoculars

Bushnell Falcon 10x50 Wide Angle Binoculars (Black)

With the right placement and concealment, using a ground blind can be just as effective as using an elevated stand. Deer will rarely spot you if you use these tips to conceal your blind. Deer see sharp edges very clearly, so don't set up your blind on a hill or ridge, where its profile will stand in stark contrast with the sky. Set up in an area with background cover that is at least as tall and wide as your blind, for example at the base of a hill, in a dip in the terrain, or in front of a stand of trees.

 

Find a good hiding spot where the natural vegetation breaks up the pattern of the landscape, such as a scraggly stand of trees, low-hanging branches, a wild mix of grass and brush, a downed tree, or a large pile of wood or hay. Your hiding place will vary depending on the landscape. If the spot you want to set up your blind lacks natural cover, you can make your own. Drag a pile of dead branches over to your lucky spot to draw attention away from your blind and to make your blind look less out of place.

 

The cover behind you should be the thick and full. It should be as tall and wide as your blind and have few if any "holes"--places where the sky shows through--in order to fully conceal your profile. You need less cover in front and to the side than in the background. Pay attention to the shadow cast by your blind. If possible, set up so that your shadow is swallowed up by the shadow of trees or other tall landmarks around you.

 

If you know the trail a deer typically follows, don't set up your blind where the deer will walk straight towards it. Set up at an angle to the trail so that the deer is less likely to see your blind. If possible, position yourself so that the deer, following its usual route, will be angled away from or broadside to your blind.

 

Another concealment trick is to set up decoys to distract game and draw their attention away from your blind. Depending on the type of hunting you do, decoys may or may not be a good option. If the decoys seem unnatural to a deer, they can work against you rather than for you.

 

To keep deer from sniffing you out, check the wind direction and set up your blind downwind from where the deer will approach you. Spray your hunting blind, clothes, and equipment with an odor neutralizer to further conceal your scent.

 

If you hunt on private land, the best way to keep game from balking at the sight of your blind is to set it up well before you plan to hunt. Before long, the deer will come to accept your blind as a natural part of the landscape. They'll walk right past your blind without a second glance, setting you up for the perfect shot come opening day.

© 2009 KillZone Hunting Outfitters. Gear up for the season with a deer blind from KillZoneHunting.com Free shipping on all orders!

For more information on ground blinds, visit the KillZone Hunting Outfitters Blog

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Will someone please tell me how to pick out a pair of binoculars?

I need it explained in simple, easy-to-understand language.
Perhaps explain the differences as to roof prism, porro prism, wide angle, degree of angle, what the X's stand for, as I don't know how to look for a small waterproof pair which brings things way up close to use on a ship or for birdwatching.
Perhaps a certain brand and type can be suggested? I believe Bushnell are suppose to be very good but are they pricey because of the name? I see a lot of Nikons and wonder if they may be the best buy? (I am leary of Olympus because they have so many remanufactured products out there).
Any and all suggestions and info will be much appreciated. Thank you.
Also, please explain the field of view, angle of view and if some can be attached onto a tripod without an adapter.
And, should I look for fogfree lenses only?
Would ATB (allterrain) ones be best because they are more durable?

First roof vs porro. Roof prism binos are those binos with two parallel tubes, they're straight out, very compact, very sleek. Porros, are the classic bino shape, there's an offset between the rear(occular) lens and the front (objective) lens. Here's the rule of thumb, for binos under $150, stick with porro. Porros are easier to make, hence for cheaper binos they usually have better quality glass. Above $150 then it's all roof territory, because they're more waterproof and well people just like them better cause they look prettier.

The field of view of a bino determines how much area you can cover. Usually given in something like 400' at 1000 yards. This is important if you use it for birding or when you need to scan an area for something. If you already know where your object is and just need a better look, it's not that big of a deal. For birding you want to find binos with the biggest field of view.

There are a few other things you need to look for. These are the things generally listed on the box.

1. First, lens coating. There are 3 levels of coating, from best to worst they are, Fully Multi Coated, Multi Coated, and Fully Coated. Sometimes only marked as FMC, MC or FC.

2. Prism type, BK-7 or BAK4, BAK4 are generally better than BK-7

3. For magnification, stay with binos under 10x, anything above will require some type of image stabilization or be mounted on a tripod.

4. For roofs, look for binos with phase correction, sometimes noted as PC-3.

For use on a ship though you might want one that has image stabilization, those are expensive.

Bushnell are well priced, they have some crappy binos and some very good ones. I own a pair of Bushnell Legend in 8x26, awesome pair for the price.

Nikon make great binos, but they do have some crappy one out there also. I don't much care for their action series, but their travelite series are great.




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